Restricting Survey Access by Password or IP Address

You can restrict access to your survey from the collector options. If you turn on Password Protection, respondents need to enter a password in order to take the survey. If you turn on IP Restrictions, you can allow or block a list of IP addresses.

TIP! Collectors are ways to send your survey. Each collector type works a little differently, so they all have different sets of options to choose from when you set them up. If you don't see this particular option in the collector type you're using, review the info on this page, and be sure to check out the help article about that collector type.

Password Protection

If you turn on Password Protection, when respondents click the survey link, they'll be prompted to enter a password in order to access the survey. There isn't a way to create a unique password for each respondent.

To add a password to your survey:

  1. Go to the Collect Responses section of your survey.
  2. Click the name of the collector and access the collector options. You may need to click Show advanced options.
  3. Turn on Password Protection.
  4. Enter the desired password.
  5. Customize the password required message and the error message that appears when respondents enter an incorrect password.

IP Restrictions

To restrict access to your survey based on the IP addresses of your respondents:

  1. Go to the Collect Responses section of your survey.
  2. Click the name of the collector and access the collector options. You may need to click Show advanced options.
  3. Turn on IP Restrictions.
  4. Choose either to allow only a specific list of IP address to take your survey or to block a specific list of IP addresses from taking your survey.
  5. Enter the IP addresses.
  6. Click Edit "survey closed" message. If someone's IP address is blocked, they'll see this closed message.

Using Wildcards in IP Addresses

IP addresses are represented in dot-decimal notation—four different numbers, each ranging from 0 to 255, separated by decimal points. Each number represents 8 bits (an octet) of the IP address. Here's an example with each of the four octets shown in a different color: 172.16.254.1

You can use an asterisk (*) as a wildcard to allow or block a particular range of IP addresses by octet. Here are some examples:

Example Formats
Description
192.*Includes IPs that start with the first octet. The second, third, and fourth octets could each be any number from 0 to 255.
192.0.*Includes IPs that start with the first two octets. The third and fourth octets could each be any number from 0 to 255.
192.0.2.*Includes IPs that start with the first three octets. The fourth octet could be any number from 0 to 255.
192.0.*.2Includes IPs that start with the first two octets and end with the fourth octet. The third octet could be any number from 0 to 255.
192.*.2Includes all IPs that contain the first and third octet. The second and fourth octets could each be any number from 0 to 255. This equivalent to 192.*.2.*, only you don't need to put the last asterisk.
TIP! If you want only a particular group of people to access your survey and you don't know all the IP addresses you need to allow or block, we recommend adding a password to your survey instead.
You can restrict access to your survey by password or IP address from the collector options.

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