Using Audience to Reach a Target Market

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Getting Started

We know that getting the right people into your survey is just as important as the survey itself. When you buy survey responses using SurveyMonkey Audience, there are two great ways to help your survey reach the respondents you need:

2 Choose from the targeting options available in your Targeted Audience Collector

2 Use screening questions and disqualification logic in your survey

 

Demographics & Targeting Options

You can send your survey to the people you need using our available targeting options, like age, income, region, employment status, and more. Our respondents are pre-profiled on dozens of attributes.

You can see the Basic and Advanced Demographics in your Targeted Audience Collector to narrow down who’ll take your survey. Or see a preview of available targeting options.

If you’re buying a global panel, you’ll choose from different targeting options.

 

Screening Questions & Disqualification Logic

Screening Questions

If you can't find the exact targeting criteria you need in our Audience collector, add one or more screening questions to your survey and apply logic to disqualify respondents.

Screening and disqualifying respondents is useful when you want to hear from specific types of people. For example:

  • You want to find people who have shopped at a particular store in the last 30 days.
  • You want to find Netflix subscribers who have watched one or more episodes of House of Cards.
  • You want to find people who have purchased premium whiskey in the last 6 months.
TIP! Try out an example survey to better understand how to ask qualifying questions.

Disqualification Logic

Adding disqualification logic to your screening questions allows relevant respondents to take the rest of your survey, while others are skipped to a disqualification page.

To add disqualification logic:

  1. Add your desired screening questions to your survey design.
  2. Make sure to require the screening questions.
  3. Add Question Skip Logic or Page Skip Logic, depending which you need.
  4. Choose to skip to a Disqualification Page.
If you choose to skip to End of Survey, please note this does not count as disqualification logic and respondents will be considered Completed Responses.

 

Incidence Rate

When you're buying survey responses for a US panel, you need to choose an incidence rate if you used disqualification logic in your survey. If your survey doesn't have disqualification logic, you don't need to choose an incidence rate—the incidence rate dropdown menu is greyed out and incidence doesn't affect your cost.

The incidence rate is the percentage of respondents you think will qualify for your survey after answering your screening questions.

To set your incidence rate, select a range from the Incidence Rate dropdown in the Targeted Audience Collector.

If you’re buying a global panel, you’ll choose from different targeting options.

Choosing an Incidence Rate

The incidence rate you choose affects the number of people we send your survey to. For example, if you want 100 completed responses for your survey and you estimate an incidence rate of 50%, we'll send the survey to up to 200 respondents.

If you're not sure what incidence rate to choose, it's better to estimate a lower incidence rate (rather than higher) to help ensure you get all the completed responses you requested. If you estimate too high a rate, you may receive fewer completed responses than you need.

We're not able to help you choose the correct incidence rate for your survey—you are responsible for understanding how the incidence rate will affect your project.

How Incidence Rate Affects Your Project

To get the number of completed responses you ordered, we adjust the number of respondents we'll send your survey to based on your incidence rate.

  • A high incidence rate indicates the type of respondents you're looking for are easy to find—a high percentage of respondents will qualify for your survey. Higher incidence rates cost less per response since we send your survey to fewer people.
  • A low incidence rate indicates the type of respondents you're looking for are hard to find—a low percentage of respondents will qualify for your survey. Lower incidence rates cost more per response since we have to send your survey to more respondents to find enough people who qualify.

For example, if your incidence rate is 10%, it means that for 100 completed responses, we have to send your survey to 1,000 respondents in order to find enough people who qualify.

Use our preview page! To understand how incidence rate might affect the cost of your project, you can play around with the Audience preview page. Choose some targeting options and incidence rates to get a feel for how prices are affected.
Estimated vs. Actual Incidence Rate

When you choose an incidence rate for your project, it's an estimated incidence rate. Your actual incidence rate is calculated for you as your results come in.

If you already have a project going, you can refer to your actual incidence rate in the collector. Go to the Collect Responses section of your survey and click the Targeted Audience Collector. The actual incidence rate is the number of respondents who qualified for the survey out of the total number of respondents who answered the screening questions.

If the actual incidence rate is higher than your estimate, your project should complete on time with the number of completes you ordered.

If the actual incidence rate is lower than your estimate, you may not get all the completed responses you ordered since more respondents will be disqualified from your survey. To collect more responses, you'll need to buy a new project using the actual incidence rate recorded for the survey.

To improve your chances of having your project go smoothly and getting the number of completed responses you need, it's better to estimate a lower incidence rate than you expect, even if it costs a little more. It you estimate too high a rate, you may receive fewer completed responses than you ordered. If you misestimated your incidence rate, we're not able to offer a refund.

 

Tips for Estimating Incidence Rate

While we're not able to help you choose the correct incidence rate for your survey, we have some tips we can share. Finding just the right people to survey has always been a challenge for market research, so if you don't know where to begin, don't worry—there are some techniques that people have developed to help estimate incidence rates.

Check your company's market research data

Many companies already know roughly what to expect. For instance, a skiing equipment retailer may already have a rough idea of the income and age ranges of their customers, and roughly what percent of people in those demographics purchase skis. Try asking your colleagues if they know who would have access to data like this.

Do some quick research online

If you're targeting a well-known or well-researched population, there may be useful industry evidence documented online. For instance, if you are studying clothes dryers, a quick online search provides a study that shows roughly 85% of Americans own dryers. Therefore, 85% might be a good estimated incidence rate.

Run a small project before your final project

You can get a better idea (within a margin of error of +/- 10%) of the incidence rate for your screening questions by surveying just 100 people. This strategy works best if you plan on buying a larger sample and don't mind spending around $100 or so to get a better idea of what your incidence rate will be. Here's how:

1. Create a test survey

Create a short test survey containing the exact screening questions you'll be using in your survey.

Make sure to require the questions, but avoid using disqualification logic for this test.

The shorter the survey, the less expensive the project, so it's okay to only include the screening questions.

Let’s say you're a meal delivery company planning to launch a new taco meal, so you’d like some feedback from current meal delivery customers who eat tacos. If you don’t know the incidence rate needed for this demographic, you could add these screening questions to your test survey.

2. Launch a test project

Create a Targeted Audience Collector for the test survey and buy 100 survey responses.

Choose your targeting options carefully, as you'll want to use the exact same targeting options for your final project or the incidence rate won't be accurate.

3. Calculate your incidence rate

Once your project is complete, you can easily calculate your actual incidence rate:

  1. Go to the Analyze Results section of your survey.
  2. Apply a Filter by Question and Answer. Select the answer choice you want your target audience to select.
  3. At the top of the page, you'll see the number of responses included in your filter compared to the total number of survey responses you received.
  4. Insert that information into the above equation to calculate your actual incidence rate.

Continuing with the meal delivery company example from step 1, let's say you ran a test surveying 100 respondents. Calculate your incidence rate by applying filters to your 2 test screening questions.

With the filters applied, you see there are 28 respondents out of the 100 surveyed who answered they eat tacos and subscribe to a meal delivery service—so your incidence rate would be 28%.

4. Launch the final project

Use the exact same screening questions that you used in your test survey in your final project. Even minor wording changes can greatly affect the incidence rate.

Make sure to require the screening questions and apply disqualification logic to them, as outlined at the top of this article.

Create a Targeted Audience Collector for the survey using the incidence rate you got for the test. Since the sample for the test survey was small, the actual incidence rate could be 10% higher or lower due to the margin of error, so we recommend you estimate 10% lower than the actual incidence rate for the test project just to be safe.

 

If you need to find a specific group of people to take your survey when using SurveyMonkey Audience, you can add one or more screening questions to your survey and apply logic to disqualify respondents. When you're buying survey responses, you need to choose an incidence rate if you used disqualification logic in your survey.

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